TEXAS? ALBUQUERQUE?


Would anyone be interested in hosting me in Albuquerque or in the Great State of Texas next month?

As you can see below, I have a talk at Upaya Zen Center in Santa Fe on July 10th. I’ve just been asked if I can make it to El Paso on July 15th. Albuquerque is in between. So if anyone wants me to speak in Albuquerque between July 11th and July 14th, I can do it. Let me know if you’re interested!

Also, I have been trying to find gigs in Dallas, Austin and Houston for a while now. But it’s been difficult to get anything worked out. If you’re interested in discussing the possibilities, please write to:

booking@bradwarnershardcorezen.com

Here’s the latest video about my new book in case you haven’t seen it yet:

 

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LIVING ROOM TOUR OF THE NORTHEAST
• 19-June    Toronto    7 p.m.    Snow Lion Bookstore 708a Pape Avenue, Toronto, ON

• 20-June   Ithaca, NY    7 p.m.    Ulysses Philomathic Library 74 E. Main Street, Trumansburg, NY 14886    https://www.facebook.com/events/177703205728097/?ref=14

• 21-June    Pittsburgh    7 p.m.    Black Cat Tattoos 3419 Butler Street 15201 Pittsburgh, PA    https://www.facebook.com/events/167000203473975/?ref=14

• 22-June    Akron    7 p.m.    Arkham Tattoo 788 North Main Street, Akron, OH 44310 https://www.facebook.com/events/471238089631983/

• 22-June    Akron 10 p.m. Zero Defex at Old Haunts Tavern 1527 E. Market St. Akron, OH

• 23-June    Cleveland   6 pm zazen, 7pm talk 1360 W. Miner, Mayfield Hts, OH 44124    https://www.facebook.com/events/554215741287955/?ref=14

• 23-June     Cleveland 10 p.m. Zero Defex at Now That’s Class 11213 Detroit Ave  Cleveland, OH 44102

• 24-June    Pitman, NJ    8 p.m.    519 Grandview Ave, Pitman, NJ 08071    https://www.facebook.com/events/535192329849584/?ref=14

• 25-June    Philadelphia, PA    8 p.m.    1547 E. Berks St., Philadelphia, PA 19125

• 26-June    Newark, Delaware    5:30 p.m.    The Meadow (next to the co-op) 280 East Main Street, Market East Plaza, Newark, DE 19711 https://www.facebook.com/events/138021953061773/

• 27-June    Annapolis, Maryland    7 p.m.    Universalist Unitarian Church of Annapolis 333 Dubois Rd, Annapolis, MD 21401    https://www.facebook.com/events/541018419278312/?ref=14

• 28-June    Asbury Park, NJ    7 p.m. Pure Health Bar & Yoga 701 Cookman Ave Asbury Park, NJ

• 29-June    Long Island, NY 7 p.m.  Clear Mountain Zen Center 519 Hempstead Ave., West Hempstead, NY 11553

UPAYA ZEN CENTER

• 10 July Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Rd  Santa Fe, NM 87501 http://www.upaya.org/index.php

RETREAT AT MT. BALDY

• Nov 8-11 We will hold another retreat at Mt. Baldy Zen Center. Registration open now!

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Donations to this blog are always gleefully accepted!

98 Responses

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  1. Mumbles
    Mumbles June 17, 2013 at 4:41 am | |

    Huh, just guessing but “spiritual porn” and “guitar porn” sounds a lot like JG’s take on McDonalds…

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YDTfEhChgw

  2. Harlan
    Harlan June 17, 2013 at 6:14 am | |

    Our behavior is at least partially based on experience. And we like to be mentally prepared for what might happen. Reliving the past or anticipating the future can be the wrong glasses for dealing with the present. For the present you need Rayban’s RB2140 901.

  3. anon 108
    anon 108 June 17, 2013 at 6:37 am | |

    Rayban’s RB2140 901 – original wayfarers? I’ve got a pair of them. They were fine for my previous present. My present present requires that I install prescription lenses. But I make do. “For now I see through a glass blurry but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.” Oh yeah.

  4. Mark Foote
    Mark Foote June 17, 2013 at 7:00 am | |

    Sorry, John H, did you say something?

  5. Mark Foote
    Mark Foote June 17, 2013 at 7:04 am | |

    Doors, mmmm.

    Just kidding, John, I heard you. Have you learned anything here? I have. And what would that be? Nothing that interests you, I suppose; stuff about brain stimulation and out-of-body experiences, stuff about alchemy and some great tunes I never heard before. A little bit about Nina Hartley, something about Japanese B monster movies and punk in Ohio, a lot about what people bring to Zen, a little bit about how to write and what I needed to write for my own benefit.

    Do you write for your own benefit, or are you sharing farts for our benefit?

  6. Mark Foote
    Mark Foote June 17, 2013 at 7:08 am | |

    ah-hem. I was sitting before I turned in last night, and had a waking dream of two cats playing in a field that changed into a straight and broad river between two very green banks, that ran from below me into the distance. That’s my path, there, I think, although it’s sort of a hard one to walk on…

  7. Mark Foote
    Mark Foote June 17, 2013 at 7:12 am | |

    I went to bed; dreaming is better done lying down, I think, though I appreciate the psychic connection.

  8. Mumbles
    Mumbles June 17, 2013 at 10:13 am | |

    If life has a base that it stands upon…then my [life] without a doubt stands upon this memory. It is of lying half asleep, half awake, in bed in the nursery of St. Ives. It is of hearing the waves…breaking, one, two, one, two, behind a yellow blind. It is of hearing the blind draw its little acorn across the floor as the wind blew the blind out. It is of lying and hearing…and feeling, it is almost impossible that I should be here… -Virginia Woolf, “A Sketch of the Past”

  9. Harlan
    Harlan June 17, 2013 at 1:58 pm | |

    I need a suggestion for a LONG fiction read. Anyone read anything good this year?

    1. The Grand Canyon
      The Grand Canyon June 18, 2013 at 2:48 am | |

      If you are looking for a LONG fiction read, try the Bible. You can get one free in almost every motel room. If you would like something a little shorter, there is a book of fiction that was just released called “There Is No God and He Is Always With You,” but I have to warn you that so far it is getting mixed reviews.

  10. DanJ
    DanJ June 17, 2013 at 2:12 pm | |

    Name of the wind by Patrick Rothfuss
    Shantaram by David Gregory Roberts

  11. Alan Sailer
    Alan Sailer June 17, 2013 at 3:09 pm | |

    Harlan,

    I am a fairly undisciplined reader in general but decided to read (and just finished) “War and Peace”.

    I have tried several Russian novels with indifferent results, but W&P was terrific.

    And right now I am enjoying “Telegraph Road” by Michael Chabon.

    Cheers.

  12. Mumbles
    Mumbles June 17, 2013 at 3:43 pm | |

    You can’t go wrong with anything by W.G. Sebald, in fact, chances are, if you read one, you’ll end up reading them all, and that will take a bit of time…well spent.

  13. Mumbles
    Mumbles June 17, 2013 at 3:46 pm | |

    Probably good to start with this one, although I read Rings of Saturn first…
    http://www.amazon.com/Vertigo-W-G-Sebald/dp/0811214850/ref=pd_sim_b_1

  14. SoF
    SoF June 17, 2013 at 8:39 pm | |

    Porn is a lusting for something that you can not (immediately) have.

    Enlightenment Porn is a titillating (pun) description of an ‘enlightenment experience’ which many others might ooh and aah over.

    I was thinking… if I ever had an ‘out of body’ experience, I don’t remember it or else it was not impressive. It’s a relief to know that I am still unenlightened.

    (see frame 4) – here in the 10 Ox Herding Pictures – sometimes called (mislabeled) 10 Bull Text.

    Another version HERE

    The D.T. Suzuki translation of the 84 Page “Manual of Zen Buddhism” in PDF format is HERE

    The Sopranos view of death is HERE

    Someoe got whacked at the end; it was the viewing audience!

    or not

    “whatever happened, we never got to see the result”
    Now THAT is Zen.

  15. Harlan
    Harlan June 18, 2013 at 8:15 am | |

    Thanks for all the good suggestions..

  16. Mumbles
    Mumbles June 18, 2013 at 2:40 pm | |

    Harlan, I’ve had that great Wilco song you posted the other day stuck in my head and just threw this on to unstick it and figured its right in line w/Brad’s new book…or not?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjJ9TgG-urk

    1. Harlan
      Harlan June 18, 2013 at 7:46 pm | |

      Mumbles, Whether it’s right in line with Brad’s message or not it’s still a good song..

  17. Fred
    Fred June 18, 2013 at 3:31 pm | |

    http://egregores.blogspot.ca/2009/05/brad-warner-versus-dalai-lama.html

    “I want to return to Brad Warner now. He said: “there is this sense that there’s an underlying ground to the universe, and that … that we all partake in it and we’re all manifestations of that and that this underlying ground is not just dead matter, it’s something alive.” Buddhists certainly do not necessarily believe in the Christian God (although Buddhists are free to do so if they wish), but Buddhism does have it’s own conceptions of the divine, and Warner has done a nice job explaining that conception in a very few, plainly spoken, words.

    Although he doesn’t use the words, my opinion is that the “ground” that Warner refers to is what Mahayana Buddhists call “Buddha Nature” or in Sanskrit Tathagatagarbha. One of the most important figures in the history of Buddhist philosophy in China was Tao-Sheng (360-434), who is closely associated with the concept of Universal Buddha Nature.”

  18. Shodo
    Shodo June 18, 2013 at 6:25 pm | |

    I like this book:

    “”Pruning the Bodhi Tree: the Storm over Critical Buddhism”
    explores serious issues regarding the understanding of Buddhism in the academy,
    the role of the scholar, and the possibility of objective scholarship. It thus
    is part of the recent self-critical trend in Buddhist Studies exemplified in
    other works such as “Curators of the Buddha” and “Rude Awakenings”.
    “Pruning the Bodhi Tree” focuses on a contemporary movement in Japanese
    Buddhist Studies led by Matsumoto Shirø and Hakamaya Noriaki, schol-
    ars and practitioners of Søtø Zen. Matusmoto and Hakamaya call into
    question basic tenets of much of East Asian Buddhism, especially the
    doctrines of tathågata-garbha(“womb/embryo of Buddhahood”) and“original enlightenment” (hongaku).
    According to both scholars, these doctrines are “un-Buddhist.” They claim such teachings promote sloppy thinking, embrace “no-thought” at the expense of logical rigor and all-too easily dismiss language’s capacity to convey truth. Matusmoto and Hakamaya call this type of thinking “topical” and argue that it leads to a naive tolerance that often masks discriminatory, totalitarian, and ethnocentric agendas. In its stead, they advocate a “Critical Buddhism” based on
    the doctrines of anatta (no-self) and dependent origination that stresses clear thinking and compassionate action.”

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/0824819497

  19. Fred
    Fred June 19, 2013 at 4:49 am | |

    ” doctrines of tathågata-garbha(“womb/embryo of Buddhahood”) and“original enlightenment” (hongaku).
    According to both scholars, these doctrines are “un-Buddhist.” They claim such teachings promote sloppy thinking, embrace “no-thought” at the expense of logical rigor and all-too easily dismiss language’s capacity to convey truth. Matusmoto and Hakamaya call this type of thinking “topical” and argue that it leads to a naive tolerance that often masks discriminatory, totalitarian, and ethnocentric agendas”

    Well, they can argue all they want from their particular ethnocentric, and
    discriminatory agendas. Logic is a particular type of thinking and that’s all
    it is.

    Does language convey the truth? The best you could say is that it can be used
    to hint at something. In between the original enlightenment and the
    enlightenment now is a self lost in billions of words and ideas.

  20. Shodo
    Shodo June 19, 2013 at 7:28 am | |

    Fred said:
    “Well, they can argue all they want from their particular ethnocentric, and
    discriminatory agendas. Logic is a particular type of thinking and that’s all
    it is.”

    I personally find the possibility of being wrong uncomfortably exhilarating.

    I also find it interesting that the authors say that it leads to “naive tolerance” that masks “discriminatory, totalitarian, and ethnocentric agendas” – especially in light of the Eido Shimano/Joshu Sazaki debacle, and the complicity of Zen Teachers supporting the war effort during WW2.

    “Does language convey the truth? The best you could say is that it can be used
    to hint at something.”

    No better than a poetic turn of “zenny” phrase, or the shaking of a stick (or any other random”zenny” gesture done with confidence.)

  21. Steve
    Steve June 19, 2013 at 7:57 am | |

    I enjoy yelling at the movie screen. And watching a battle of cranky wavering minds is always more fun if you have a favorite to root for. So I’m just logging on to say “Go Fred!”

    Logical reasoning always seems to lead to dead end at some point. Circular definitions. I got an A in geometry in high school. Which is a system of logical reasoning based on a line, a point and a plane, none of which are definable. On the other hand, I got a D in calculus because I didn’t understand how a number could approach zero. I kept picturing a number on a scooter heading to a place called zero. If logic was enough, I wouldn’t at a buddhist website I don’t think. I want to know how to relate to the dead end. I feel pretty confident that raising a fist or screaming mu at the top of my lungs or other zennie gestures are religious theater at least in a sense. But I don’t really care. Maybe I’ve fallen into the traps and snares. Maybe I should have paid more attention in calculus rather than day dreaming about getting high after school.

    Anyway, GO FRED! (munch munch munch)

  22. Fred
    Fred June 19, 2013 at 9:05 am | |

    “I personally find the possibility of being wrong uncomfortably exhilarating.”

    That’s nice

  23. Fred
    Fred June 19, 2013 at 9:08 am | |

    “I want to know how to relate to the dead end.”

    Which dead end; they are all dead ends – especially i.

  24. Fred
    Fred June 19, 2013 at 9:15 am | |
  25. Mark Foote
    Mark Foote June 19, 2013 at 3:05 pm | |

    I know a lot of people who had a hard time in first-year calculus.

    Myself, I flunked the pre-calculus qualifying exam at my local college, and was the example offered up by the high school trig teacher for years afterward as to why a person should not discard their notes after the trig class.

    Best thing I ever did. Got a set-theory based trig class from San Mateo Junior College that gave me an appreciation for how understandable rigorous proof could be, as opposed to intuitive bullshit. First-year calculus at the university, like most places, was intuitive; it was intended for engineers who were supposed to have no appreciation for formal proof, so just shove the formulas down their throat with a “clearly; an obvious result”.

    Real Analysis, as college calculus is actually called (or was), is on the other hand built up from set theory. Like Geometry.

    And it turns out the math of consequence for computer science is Church’s lamda calculus and Godel’s recursive function theory; the math I wanted to study, but which in 1968 I was informed was passe. Take the introductory philosophy class to see Godel’s incompleteness theorem, I was told; uh-huh.

    “Proof by induction”, what happens at infinity, is considered suspect by an entire school of mathematicians; found this out reading the encyclopedia Britannica years after I debated it with my math-faculty adviser. Of course, a lot of mathematics depends on proof by induction.

    Shodo, really like that about “such teachings promote sloppy thinking, embrace “no-thought” at the expense of logical rigor and all-too easily dismiss language’s capacity to convey truth.”
    Just have to remember that not all that we hold to be true through logical induction is consistent, or if all that we hold to be true is consistent then there are things that we cannot describe with our logic that are very real. Per Godel.

  26. Fred
    Fred June 19, 2013 at 3:38 pm | |

    I got an A from Elias Zakon in Set Theory at the University of Windsor in 1967
    by memorizing his text book.

    It was all arbitrary nonsense to me.

  27. Mark Foote
    Mark Foote June 19, 2013 at 9:32 pm | |

    Sorry to hear that. A good math text and a good math teacher are hard to find, IMO.

  28. Shodo
    Shodo June 20, 2013 at 6:08 am | |

    Mark Foote said:
    “Just have to remember that not all that we hold to be true through logical induction is consistent…”

    *Nothing* is “true” via induction… :3

    “or if all that we hold to be true is consistent then there are things that we cannot describe with our logic that are very real. Per Godel.”

    All Godel’s Incompleteness Theorem says is that no sufficiently complete axiomatic system can be consistent – and no sufficiently consistent axiomatic system can be complete… So I’m not sure what you are describing, but I think I get the gist of what you are saying.

    For myself, I prefer Agrippa’s Trilemma.

  29. Mark Foote
    Mark Foote June 22, 2013 at 9:22 am | |

    Shodo, have you seen Is Arithmetic Consistent?

    Somebody gave me a copy of “Notices”, December 2008; there’s an article about formal proof using computers, and the first thing that was proved was Godel’s incompleteness theorem. They do this by having the computer break everything down into the fundamental axioms of logic. So contrary to what I take to be the drift in Agrippa’s Trilemma, it’s not that there is no consistent system corresponding to some mathematical truths; rather, it’s that the truths cannot be held to be larger truths outside the system. That’s why I am so delighted that Gautama put forward his core teaching as dependent on the existence of suffering, and didn’t contend the truth of it outside of the existence of suffering. That would be suffering in the individual, not some Platonic, metaphysical quality that exists outside of the experience of an individual, as many “Buddhists” would have it: the “life is suffering” school. Similar to the “consciousness exists outside of sense contact and sense object” school that calls itself “Buddhist”. Yeah, Buddhist in the sense of belonging to the worship of Buddha, but not really related to the teaching of Gautama the Shakyan of India, as recorded in the Pali Canon records in China, Tibet, and Southeast Asia.

  30. Mark Foote
    Mark Foote June 22, 2013 at 9:23 am | |

    whoops, “a href=”http://www.mathpages.com/home/kmath347/kmath347.htm”>Is Arithmetic Consistent?

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